Category Archives: Coal Ash

A PERSONALITY FOR EVERY POND -TRIED AND TRUE CONSTRUCTION SOILS PRACTICES HOLD PROMISE FOR ASH POND DEWATERING. ASH AT WORK ISSUE 2, 2015

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Source: Ash At Work, Issue 2 2015

As the clock ticks down toward mandatory compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) coal combustion residuals (CCR) ruling, facility owners and their engineers must rapidly move ahead with developing plans for the closure of wet ash surface impoundments and landfills.  This article highlights the need to evaluate and incorporate pre-drainage dewatering into the closure plan.

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UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION EXPERT PROVIDES NEEDED CLARITY ON MANDATED ASH POND CLOSURES. POWER MAGAZINE, 7/28/2015

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The underground is the most complex environment in construction, and coal ash ponds are no exception. By now, everyone is aware of the recent CCR ruling, which provided technical requirements for CCR landfills and surface impoundment closures. The ruling also created an additional challenge to pond closures – a fixed deadline with significant penalties for non-compliance. Moretrench has been involved in ash pond closures for decades, and has been able to provide a unique perspective to power companies and engineers struggling to find realistic solutions to this growing issue.

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Construction Considerations Are Key in Closure Planning for Coal Ash Ponds

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Mark Johnson, PG and Kent Nilsson, PE

When faced with a variety of options for coal ash pond closure, use a holistic approach rather than choosing what seems to be the quickest or cheapest on paper.

Closure and remediation solutions for coal ash ponds, or impoundments, vary greatly. Assuming the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgates the expected proposed Subtitle D regulations, technical options are plentiful, and the vast majority will be viable for most sites. Among the choices are capping, dewatering and/or stabilizing, consolidating into a new landfill, disposing off site, converting to wetlands, or any combination of these options.

There is no one-size-fits-all option, so it’s important to familiarize yourself with the advantages and disadvantages of each. This is especially important if the planning design and construction activities occur at an open and active facility. A successful closure approach accounts for the size of the pond, dewatering requirements and methods, final site use, integration of any remediation efforts, constructability, site layout, and long-term costs.

Read full article at Powermag.com.